Posted by: Yosef B. | September 22, 2014

Project Date Calculations in Excel


A relatively common demand management question I’ve been asked to solve in Excel numerous times is how do I figure out how much time is a person allocated to a project during a certain month?

The answer is relatively simple but requires a visual aid to help figure out the logic of the different scenarios:

Project Date Scenarios

As you can see – there are 4 cases that can occur. Our goal is to write an IF statement that models all of these scenarios.

Ta Da! Here you go:

=IF(AND([Project Start]<[Month Start],[Project End]>[Month End]),1,
IF(AND([Project Start]<[Month Start],[Project End]<=[Month End],[Project End]>=[Month Start]),(NETWORKDAYS([Month Start],[Project End])/NETWORKDAYS([Month Start],[Month End])),
IF(AND([Project Start]>=[Month Start],[Project Start]<[Month End],[Project End]>[Month End]),(NETWORKDAYS([Project Start],[Month End])/NETWORKDAYS([Month Start],[Month End])),
IF(AND([Project Start]>=[Month Start],[Project Start]<[Month End],[Project End]<=[Month End]),(NETWORKDAYS([Project Start],[Project End])/NETWORKDAYS([Month Start],[Month End])),0))))

Let's break this down line by line.

=IF(AND([Project Start]<[Month Start],[Project End]>[Month End]),1,

translated is case #1 and it would give us a full 100% allocation during that month.

IF(AND([Project Start]<[Month Start],[Project End]<=[Month End],[Project End]>=[Month Start]),(NETWORKDAYS([Month Start],[Project End])/NETWORKDAYS([Month Start],[Month End])),

translated is case #2 (Project End is either before or equal to Month End), we then find the number of work days between month start & project end and then divide by the number of work days in the month to find the percentage of allocated time.

IF(AND([Project Start]>=[Month Start],[Project Start]<[Month End],[Project End]>[Month End]),(NETWORKDAYS([Project Start],[Month End])/NETWORKDAYS([Month Start],[Month End])),

translated is case #4 (Project Start is after Month Start and before Month End, find the number of work days between Project Start and Month End divided by the total number of work days in the month.)

IF(AND([Project Start]>=[Month Start],[Project Start]<[Month End],[Project End]<=[Month End]),(NETWORKDAYS([Project Start],[Project End])/NETWORKDAYS([Month Start],[Month End])),0))))

translated is case #3 (Project Start is after Month Start and before Month End and Project End is before Month End, find the number of work days between Project Start and Project End divided by the total number of work days in the month.)

Using this formula, you can find (per month, or any other given date range such as an entire year) what percentage of time the project takes up within that date range. This percentage can then be used to calculate number of hours, cost of project, etc.

If you have a specific use case you are interested in getting help with let me know!

~Yosef

Posted by: Yosef B. | September 3, 2014

Help! Why won’t my Excel formula calculate?!


Note: These instructions are based off Excel 2010 but are applicable for Excel 2007 through Excel 2013 (Office 365).

Has someone sent you a spreadsheet or perhaps you’re working on one and all of a sudden your formulas look like formulas and won’t calculate? Here are the top solutions I have come across for fixing this common error.

  1. Cell text formatting is set to “Text” – If the formatting of the cell has been set to Text instead of General or some other format, the cell will not calculate because it assumes that anything in the cell is text and not a formula. Change the formatting of the cell by pulling down on the drop down in the Number section on the Home tab of the menu ribbon
  2. Excel Number Format

    Excel Number Format Expanded

  3. Show Formulas (Ctrl + ~) has been selected / pressed – If the Show Formulas option has been selected, calculations will show their full formula and not show the calculated results. To toggle back and forth, you can either use the hotkey combo Ctrl + ~ or select/deselect the Show Formulas option in the Formula Auditing section (I highly recommend learning to use all tools in this section when troubleshooting Excel problems!) on the Formulas tab of the menu ribbon.
  4. Excel_Formula_Auditing1

  5. An apostrophe (‘) has been placed before the equals (=) sign – Typically someone will have done this on purpose, however placing an apostrophe before a formula will make the cell mimic the first solution listed above where the cell formatting is set to Text. Remove the apostrophe to force the cell to calculate.
  6. Excel_Apostrophe_Formula

  7. Automatic calculation of the worksheet / cell has been turned off – If you’ve been sent an Excel sheet that’s very large, sometimes people will turn off automatic calculations so that the spreadsheet doesn’t break your computer upon opening it. To turn on or off automatic calculations within your worksheet, click on the pull down menu of the Calculation Options in the Calculation section of the Formulas tab on the ribbon bar. Alternatively, this setting can be reached by going to the File tab, selecting Options, going to the Formulas tab and then setting the Calculations options there.
  8. Excel_Calc_Options

    Excel_Calc_Options2

Hope this helps when you get stuck! I would appreciate hearing if anyone has come across other solutions to this common complaint?

~Yosef

Posted by: Yosef B. | August 28, 2014

Managing SharePoint List Permissions


I typically don’t do a lot in Microsoft SharePoint, however on my current project I’ve been working on building out a little site that has required learning some new things about it. In particular, I had a main site, with multiple lists on the site. I also have multiple groups of people setup and I wanted to ensure that each group can view the main site, but then can only view their specific list.

So it turns out that if you create a group at the site level than it automatically overrides permissions at the list level, even if you tell a list to not inherit permissions from the parent site. What you have to do is create a group at the site level but do not select any of the permission levels, just create the group without any permissions. This will create the group with “Limited Access” permissions that does not allow them to view or do anything.

Then, you go to the specific list you want to grant the group permissions to and add the group there, granting them permissions directly at the list level. In my case, I gave them “View Only” permissions because it allows users to view lists and look at documents attached to the list.

Finally, in order for users to view the main site (but not any lists below the main site), create and add them to a Visitor’s group that you grant “Read” permissions too. This restricts them to view the site, but not view any lists (besides the specific ones you grant permissions too).

Hope this helps!

The two Microsoft help articles I referenced are:

Remove users and groups from site access – Windows SharePoint Services

Customizing user access to a SharePoint list or library – SharePoint Server

Posted by: Yosef B. | August 6, 2014

Excel: How to use the INDIRECT function – Example


I received a request for a follow-up post to my last post on how to use the INDIRECT function in Excel. The request was to create a sample table showing a potential setup and use of it.

The best use I’ve found for the INDIRECT function is to build dashboards. You can have all your data stored on one sheet and then use INDIRECT formulas in combination with others to pull over only the data you want in a quick and easy manner.

In the picture below, there are two sample tables. The one on the top left is my “Original Data Table” which could be stored on any tab. The “INDIRECT Table” on the right uses INDIRECT formulas to pull over the data from the first, original table.

INDIRECT1

Remember that the INDIRECT formula takes in a text string and converts it to a cell reference. In this case, I put my column references as table headers and my row references as row IDs for my INDIRECT table. In this second picture, you can see how I combine the column reference & row reference in my INDIRECT formula to create a formula that is easily copied over to all the other cells in my table.

INDIRECT2

With properly setup column & row references, I need only write a single INDIRECT formula to pull over all my data in the correct order. I could just have easily made it skip every other row or skip a couple of columns, or even reorder the columns or rows by reordering my column & row references. My INDIRECT formula wouldn’t have to change at all!

Hope this helps! Let me know if you have any further questions.

Thanks!
~Yosef

Posted by: Yosef B. | August 5, 2014

Excel: How to use the INDIRECT function


The Excel INDIRECT function is useful for displaying data in another cell by passing it text strings to tell it where the value is.

The syntax for the Indirect function is as follows:

INDIRECT(ref_text,[a1])

Where:

ref_text is a text reference to another cell & [a1] is a logical value that specifies what type of reference style ref_text is using.

In excel you have two types of cell reference styles:

  1. A1 style is where each row has a number and each column has a letter (the default view in excel).
  2. R1C1 style is where each row has a number and each column has a number.

A1 is indicated by [a1] = “TRUE”, R1C1 is indicated by [a1] = “FALSE” in the INDIRECT formula.

For example in order to display a specific column of data in a given row (in this example, row 7), the following function is used:

=INDIRECT($B$1&$A7,TRUE)

The first argument, $B$1&$A7 concatenates the values in cell B1 & A7 together to create a text statement of where the data that needs to be displayed is stored. In this case B1 = “Data!B”, A7 = 3 so the final result is “Data!B3” so the value displayed in the cell is the value on the Data tab in the B3 cell.

Column A now displays the row of the data for that particular project on the “Data” tab.

Hope you find this useful!

~Yosef


Excel comes with a handy tool called the “Formula Auditing tool” located on the Ribbon under the “Formulas” section under “Formula Auditing”.

(Click to Enlarge)

(Click to Enlarge)

  1. The Trace Precedents tool shows you visually which cells are used by the selected cell in it’s formula.
  2. The Trace Dependents tool shows you visually which cells are used by the selected cell in it’s formula.
  3. The Evaluate Formula tool walks you through the formula in the selected cell so you can see how it’s calculating the formula. If there is an error, this is a handy way of figuring out where the calculation goes wrong so you can potentially fix it.
(Click to Enlarge)

(Click to Enlarge)

Simple right? If not – feel free to leave a comment below & I’ll try to help!

~Yosef

Posted by: Yosef B. | July 14, 2014

How to Hide Pivot Chart Filters


(Directions below are for Excel 2010)

I recently built a simple dashboard using pivot tables with corresponding pivot charts. I was asked by my client if I could remove the filters from the pivot charts so that they would have a cleaner look for presenting. I had never worried about this before and didn’t know how off the top of my head so I did a couple of quick Google searches & couldn’t find any references on how to hide the filters! I was very surprised that I couldn’t find anyone else asking the question so I thought I would share how to easily do this. Luckily it’s pretty simple – I just didn’t realize these options existed!

Here’s a Pivot chart with the usual filters visible:

Pivot with Filters

To remove these filters, click the “Field Buttons” (or drop down for more control) button on the Analyze tab of the PivotChart Tools section of the menu ribbon (only visible if the chart is selected):

Pivot Chart Filter/Field Buttons

You can then choose which (if any) filters to display so that your chart looks nice & clean:

Pivot Chart w/o Filters

Hope this helps!

~Yosef B.

Posted by: Yosef B. | July 7, 2014

Excel: Creating a Drop Down Menu


Ever wondered how to add a drop down menu to your Excel file? Here’s an easy way to add one wherever you want!

To create a drop down menu, you have two options. First, you can create a list of all the items you want to display in your Drop Down List. E.g. “Yes, No, Maybe” or “Early, Late, None”, etc. in a range of cells (one option per cell). Alternatively, simply copy a list of items, ensuring that they are comma delimited.
Once you have your items listed:

  1. Select the Data Tab from the Excel Menu Ribbon. In the “Data Tools” section, click on “Data Validation”.
  2. Under the Settings Tab, select “List” from the “Allow” drop down menu.
  3. (Click to enlarge)

    (Click to enlarge)

  4. Using the arrow on the right hand side of the “Source” box, select the list of items that you want to display in your Drop Down List.
  5. Click “OK”
(Click to enlarge)

(Click to enlarge)

Got questions? Leave a comment below!

~Yosef

Posted by: Yosef B. | June 30, 2014

Excel: Conditional Formatting


Excel provides the ability to automatically apply specified formatting to a cell based upon the value in the cell or by comparing the value of the cell vs. the value in another cell.

Here are instructions to apply basic conditional formatting:

  1. Select the first cell which you wish to have automatically highlighted based on a value in another cell.
  2. Select the Home Tab on the Ribbon. In the “Styles” section select “Conditional Formatting”. In the drop down menu select “New Rule…”.
  3. Conditional_Formatting1

  4. Select “Use a formula to determine which cells to format”
  5. In the “Format values where this formula is true:” box type in a formula that describes the values in the cell the highlighted cell is based on. For example, if you want cell A1 to change to green when cell B1 contains the value “1” type “=if(B1=1,TRUE,FALSE)”. This formula will return “TRUE” if B1 contains a 1, otherwise it will return “FALSE”. Your cell will only change color if the returned value of the function is “TRUE”.
  6. You can overlay multiple formatting rules on the same cell – therefore you can have the cell turn one color based on one rule and another color based off another rule. You do need to be careful that the formulas will not both be true at the same time otherwise your conditional formatting will not work.
    • Note: In addition to an equality, you can also use any other comparative logic symbol. Examples include: “Does not equal” e.g. =if(A1B1,TRUE,FALSE) or “Is greater than” e.g. =if(A1>B1,TRUE,FALSE).
  7. Select the “Format…” button and apply whatever formatting you want to occur when the formula returns “TRUE”.
  8. Conditional_Formatting2

  9. Click “OK”
  10. To apply your formatting to multiple cells, select the “Format Painter” tool and copy your formatting to other cells.

Pretty straight forward but if you have questions, as always leave a comment & I’ll get back to you!

~Yosef

Posted by: Yosef B. | June 11, 2014

Writing a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) Policy


I was recently asked to write a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policy for a company. While I have some experience writing policies, I had never done a BYOD policy and it opened up a lot of questions which I had not thought of and I thought I would share them for your consideration.

In this day & age, a company must have a BYOD policy due to the simple fact that virtually all employees have smartphones & have access to company (&/or client) data on their phones (e.g. through Dropbox, Google Drive, or by having data directly on the device, etc.). Your company must have an official position on how to handle this access to data in order to be in compliance with any NDAs, contracts, etc. A major concern your policy should handle is – what happens when an employee leaves your company & takes a device that stores company data with them?

You need to be very clear of who owns what. The employee owns the device but who owns the apps & data? For example – what happens if the employee is terminated and the company remote wipes their device to remove company data, but this also deletes personal data? Is the company liable?

What types of security should a company require & how will you enforce your requirements? Do you require just a password? Do you require whole device encryption? Do you require the company to have the ability to remote access / wipe the device?

Who is responsible for supporting devices? If so, What devices are allowed or included in the policy? What level of support will you provide?

What does an employee have to do to leave with their device? Do they have to prove that they’ve removed data, apps, access?

What do you do if you find illegal information or activities (such as child pornography) on the device? Does it make a difference if it’s in an “area” of the device that’s not work related?

What level of involvement does the legal team need to have? What rights does the company have to audit or look at the device holistically vs. just company data, apps, etc.? Example being if there are multiple email accounts in the same app (work & non-work), what rights does the company have to access just the work email account of the app (if it’s even technically possible)?

If your employees are consultants and work for multiple clients and those client’s email requires different device management controls – how do you reconcile multiple security policies on the same device?

An interesting fact I came across is Juniper Networks released results of a survey (back in 2012) of more than 4,000 mobile-device users and IT professionals & found that many employees circumvent their employers official mobile-device policies, with 41% of all respondents who use their personal devices for work doing so without permission from the company.

In other words, at a bare minimum, you need a policy to cover yourselves legally but it may not be enforceable & you may just have to live with that (which could unfortunately backfire in court as well – if the argument is that you had a non-enforceable policy, the court could invalidate the entire policy).

Tricky thing writing policies…

Got an example of a good or bad BYOD policy? I would love to hear from you!

~Yosef B.

Older Posts »

Categories

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 166 other followers

%d bloggers like this: